Thomas R Carper

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Thomas Richard "Tom" Carper (born January 23, 1947) is an American politician from Wilmington, Delaware, in New Castle County. He is a member of the Democratic Party, served as U. S. Representative from Delaware, Governor of Delaware, and is the incumbent junior U.S. Senator from Delaware.

Early life and family

Carper was born January 23, 1947 in Beckley, West Virginia, grew up in Danville, Virginia, and graduated from Whetstone High School in Columbus, Ohio. He graduated from Ohio State University in 1964, where he was in the Navy ROTC and earned a degree in Economics. Carper served as a pilot in the U.S. Navy from 1968 until 1973 and saw duty in Vietnam piloting submarine hunting planes. He remained in the Naval Reserve for another 18 years and retired with the rank of Captain. Meanwhile he moved to Delaware and earned an MBA from the University of Delaware in 1975. He married Martha Ann Stacy and has two children, Christopher and Benjamin. They are members of the Presbyterian Church.[1] [2] [3]

Early political career

Carper worked in Delaware's economic development office from 1975 through 1976 and was elected Delaware State Treasurer in 1976, serving three terms from 1977 through 1982. In that office he developed Delaware's first cash management system. In 1982 he was elected U.S. Representative from Delaware and served five terms from January 3, 1983 until January 3, 1993. As a Congressman, he was a member of the Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee and the Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee. He chaired the House Subcommittee on Economic Stabilization. In these positions he worked to allow banks into the securities business and to discourage the dumping of sludge into the ocean. [4] [5]

Governor of Delaware

In 1992 he was elected Governor of Delaware and served two terms from January 19, 1993 until January 3, 2001, when he resigned to take his seat in the U.S. Senate. As Governor, Carper led an ongoing effort to cut taxes by reducing income tax rates, eliminating the marriage penalty and estate tax, cutting the public utility tax, and eliminating the gross receipts tax for many small businesses. His administration improved the state's credit rating from among the worst in the nation to a respectable "AAA" rating. In educational programs he continued a nationally recognized standards-based education program, raising standards, testing students, pushing through a teacher accountability bill. Other programs included a fully funded Head Start program and creation of a prescription drug benefit for seniors. [6] [7]

United States Senator

In 2000 he was elected U.S. Senator from Delaware, defeating incumbent Republican U.S. Senator William V. Roth. He is serving in his first term, having taken office January 3, 2001. Carper is a member of the moderate Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), of which he presently serves as Vice-Chairman. In December 2004 Carper became a member of the Senate Democratic Leadership. As a member of the four person "Executive Committee" he became one of four deputy whips. David Broder of the Washington Post called Carper, "a notably effective and nonpartisan leader, admired and trusted on both sides of the aisle." Carper has worked to institute a national energy policy, a balanced budget, strong environmental protections, welfare reform, and national education standards. [8]

Carper serves on the following committees in the 109th Congress:

Carper joined in the unsuccesful attempt to tie the Bush administration tax cuts to deficit reduction and has supported additional funding for school choice programs and charter schools. He has also sought additional funding for railroad projects and for rail security. Carper has been a leader on Postal reform issues, limiting Internet taxation, and expanding emission controls. He strongly supported legislation to limit class action lawsuits and has proposed the creation of a National Park in Delaware, the Coastal Heritage Park to be in four locations along the Delaware River and Delaware Bay.[9]

Carper's term expires in January 2007, and is considered to be among the safest seats in the U.S. Senate. Speculation regarding an opponent has centered around wealthy business executive Michele M. Rollins.

Popular election results

Template:Start box !bgcolor=#cccccc |Year !bgcolor=#cccccc |Office !bgcolor=#cccccc |Election ! !bgcolor=#cccccc |Subject !bgcolor=#cccccc |Party !bgcolor=#cccccc |Votes !bgcolor=#cccccc |Pct ! !bgcolor=#cccccc |Opponent !bgcolor=#cccccc |Party !bgcolor=#cccccc |Votes !bgcolor=#cccccc |Pct |- |1982 |U.S. House |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |98,533 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |52% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Thomas B. Evans, Jr. |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |87,153 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |46% |- |1984 |U.S. House |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |142,070 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |58% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Elise du Pont |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |100,650 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |41% |- |1986 |U.S. House |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |106,351 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |66% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Thomas S. Neuberger |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |53,767 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |33% |- |1988 |U.S. House |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |158,338 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |68% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |James P. Krapf |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |76,179 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |32% |- |1990 |U.S. House |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |116,274 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |66% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Ralph O. Williams |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |58,037 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |33% |- |1992 |Governor |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |179,365 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |65% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |B. Gary Scott |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |90,725 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |33% |- |1996 |Governor |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |188,300 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |70% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Janet C. Rzewnicki |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |82,654 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |30% |- |2000 |U.S. Senate |General | |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Thomas R. Carper |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |Democratic |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |181,566 |bgcolor=#B3D9FF |56% | |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |William V. Roth, Jr. |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |Republican |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |142,891 |bgcolor=#FFB3B3 |44% Template:End box

Notes

  1. ^  Biographical Dictionary of the U.S. Congress. Carper, Thomas R.. Retrieved August 22, 2005.
  2. ^  Russell Pickett Delaware and U.S.History. Retrieved August 7, 2005
  3. ^  Barone, Michael & Richard E. Cohen (2005). The Almanac of American Politics, Washington: National Journal Group. ISBN 0-89234-112-2.
  4. ^  Barone, Michael The Almanac of American Politics 2005.
  5. ^  Jobs for America's Graduates Tom Carper. Retrieved September 17, 2005.
  6. ^  Barone, Michael The Almanac of American Politics 2005.
  7. ^  Jobs for America's Graduates Tom Carper. Retrieved September 17, 2005.
  8. ^  Jobs for America's Graduates Tom Carper. Retrieved September 17, 2005.
  9. ^  Barone, Michael The Almanac of American Politics 2005.

References

  • Barone, Michael & Richard E. Cohen (2005). The Almanac of American Politics, Washington: National Journal Group. ISBN 0-89234-112-2.
  • Biographical Dictionary of the U.S. Congress. Carper, Thomas R.. Retrieved August 22, 2005.
  • Jobs for America's Graduates Tom Carper. Retrieved September 17, 2005.
  • Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives Election Statistics. Retrieved September 17, 2005.

External links

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