Demographics of Lithuania

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The earliest evidence of inhabitants in present-day Lithuania dates back to 10,000 BC. Between 3,000–2,000 BC, the cord-ware culture people spread over a vast region of eastern Europe, between the Baltic Sea and the Vistula River in the West and the Moscow-Kursk line in the East. Merging with the indigenous population, they gave rise to the Balts, a distinct Indo-European ethnic group whose descendants are the present-day Lithuanian and Latvian nations and Prussians (who are no longer independent). The name Lietuva, or Lithuania, might be derived from the word lietava, for a small river, or lietus, meaning rain (or land of rain).

Lithuanians are neither Slavic nor Germanic, although the union with Poland, Germanic and Russian colonization and settlement left cultural and religious influences. This highly literate society places strong emphasis upon education, which is free and compulsory until age 16. Most Lithuanians and ethnic Poles belong to the Roman Catholic Church; Eastern Orthodoxy is the largest non-Catholic denomination.

Enduring several border changes, Soviet deportations, a massacre of its Jewish population, and German and Polish repatriations during and after World War II, Lithuania has maintained a fairly stable percentage of ethnic Lithuanians (from 79.3% in 1959 to 83.5% in 2002). Lithuania's citizenship law and constitution meet international and OSCE standards, guaranteeing universal human and civil rights.

The Lithuanian language, written with the Latin alphabet, has been the official language of Lithuania again since 1989. The Soviet era had imposed the official use of Russian, so most Lithuanians speak Russian as a second language while the resident Slavic populace generally speaks Russian or Polish as a first language.

Statistical indicators

Ethnic groups (Lithuanian Statistics Office census 2001): Lithuanians 83.45%, Poles 6.74%, Russians 6.31%, Belarusians 1.23%, other 2.27%

File:Lithuania demography.png
Demographics of Lithuania, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands.

From CIA World Factbook 2000(?).

Population: 3.445 million (2004 est.)

Age structure:
0–14 years: 19% (male 357,712; female 342,796)
15–64 years: 67% (male 1,177,732; female 1,259,682)
65 years and over: 14% (male 163,470; female 319,364) (2000 est.)

Population growth rate: −0.29% (2000 est.)

Birth rate: 9.77 births/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Death rate: 12.87 deaths/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Net migration rate: 0.16 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.04 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 0.93 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.51 male(s)/female
total population: 0.88 male(s)/female (2000 est.)

Infant mortality rate: 14.67 deaths/1,000 live births (2000 est.)

Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 69.09 years
male: 63.07 years
female: 75.41 years (2000 est.)

Total fertility rate: 1.34 children born/woman (2000 est.)

Nationality:
noun: Lithuanian(s)
adjective: Lithuanian

Religions: Roman Catholic (primarily), Lutheran, Eastern Orthodox, Protestant, Evangelical Christian Baptist, Muslim, Judaism

Languages: Lithuanian (official), Polish, Russian

Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 98%
male: 99%
female: 98% (1989 est.)

pt:Demografia da Lituânia

See also

sr:Литванци