April 1st RFC

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Every April Fool's Day (1 April) since 1989, the Internet Engineering Task Force has published one or more humorous RFC documents, following in the path blazed by the June 1973 RFC titled ARPAWOCKY. The following list also includes humorous RFCs published on other dates.

List

  • RFC 527 — ARPAWOCKY R. Merryman, UCSD. 22 June 1973. A Lewis Carroll pastiche.
  • RFC 748 — Telnet randomly-lose option. M.R. Crispin. 1 April 1978. (Format: TXT=2741 bytes) (Status: UNKNOWN) A parody of the TCP/IP documentation style.
  • RFC 968 — Twas the night before start-up. V.G. Cerf, 1 December 1985.
  • RFC 1097 — Telnet subliminal-message option. B. Miller. 1 April 1989. (Format: TXT=5490 bytes) (Status: UNKNOWN)
  • RFC 1149 — Standard for the transmission of IP datagrams on Avian Carriers. D. Waitzman. 1 April 1990. (Format: TXT=3329 bytes) (Updated by RFC 2549) (Status: EXPERIMENTAL) A deadpan skewering of standards-document legalese, describing protocols for transmitting Internet data packets by carrier pigeon. In 2001, RFC 1149 was actually implemented by members of the Bergen (Norway) Linux User Group.
  • RFC 1216 — Gigabit Network Economics and Paradigm Shifts. Poorer Richard, Prof. Kynikos. 1 April 1991. (Format: TXT=8130 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1217 — Memo from the Consortium for Slow Commotion Research (CSCR). Vint Cerf. 1 April 1991. (Format: TXT=11079 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1313 — Today's Programming for KRFC AM 1313 Internet Talk Radio. C. Partridge. 1 April 1992. (Format: TXT=5444 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL) (Certain portions of this RFC are obsolete: Doppler shift while flying on the Concorde is no longer a problem.)
  • RFC 1437 — The Extension of MIME Content-Types to a New Medium. N. Borenstein, M. Linimon. 1 April 1993. (Format: TXT=13356 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1438 — Internet Engineering Task Force Statements Of Boredom (SOBs). A. Lyman Chapin, C. Huitema. 1 April 1993. (Format: TXT=3044 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1605 — SONET to Sonnet Translation. William Shakespeare. 1 April 1994. (Format: TXT=4451 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1606 — A Historical Perspective On The Usage Of IP Version 9. J. Onions. 1 April 1994. (Format: TXT=8398 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1607 — A VIEW FROM THE 21ST CENTURY. Vint Cerf. 1 April 1994. (Format: TXT=28165 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1776 — The Address is the Message. Steve Crocker. 1 April 1995. (Format: TXT=2051 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL) Without content, would we need information security?
  • RFC 1924 — A Compact Representation of IPv6 Addresses. R. Elz. 1 April 1996. (Format: TXT=10409 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1925 — The Twelve Networking Truths. R. Callon. 1 April 1996. (Format: TXT=4294 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1926 — An Experimental Encapsulation of IP Datagrams on Top of ATM. J. Eriksson. 1 April 1996. (Format: TXT=2969 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 1927 — Suggested Additional MIME Types for Associating Documents. C. Rogers. 1 April 1996. (Format: TXT=5254 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2100 — The Naming of Hosts. J. Ashworth. 1 April 1997. (Format: TXT=4077 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2321 — RITA -- The Reliable Internetwork Troubleshooting Agent. A. Bressen. 1 April 1998. (Format: TXT=12302 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2322 — Management of IP numbers by peg-dhcp. K. van den Hout, A. Koopal, R. van Mook. 1 April 1998. (Format: TXT=12665 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2323 — IETF Identification and Security Guidelines. A. Ramos. 1 April 1998. (Format: TXT=9257 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2324 — Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol (HTCPCP/1.0). L. Masinter. 1 April 1998. (Format: TXT=19610 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2325 — Definitions of Managed Objects for Drip-Type Heated Beverage Hardware Devices using SMIv2. M. Slavitch. 1 April 1998. (Format: TXT=12726 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2549 — IP over Avian Carriers with Quality of Service. D. Waitzman. 1 April 1999. (Format: TXT=9519 bytes) (Updates RFC 1149) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2550 — Y10K and Beyond. S. Glassman, M. Manasse, J. Mogul. 1 April 1999. (Format: TXT=28011 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2551 — The Roman Standards Process -- Revision III. S. Bradner. 1 April 1999. (Format: TXT=28054 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 2795 — The Infinite Monkey Protocol Suite (IMPS). S. Christey. 1 April 2000. (Format: TXT=42902 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 3091 — Pi Digit Generation Protocol. H. Kennedy. 1 April 2001.
  • RFC 3092 — Etymology of "Foo". D. Eastlake 3rd, C. Manros, E. Raymond. 1 April 2001.
  • RFC 3093 — Firewall Enhancement Protocol (FEP). M. Gaynor, S. Bradner. 1 April 2001.
  • RFC 3251 — Electricity over IP. B. Rajagopalan. 1 April 2002. (Format: TXT=18941 bytes) (Status: INFORMATIONAL)
  • RFC 3252 — Binary Lexical Octet Ad-hoc Transport. H. Kennedy. 1 April 2002.
  • RFC 3514 — The Security Flag in the IPv4 Header (Evil Bit). S. Bellovin. 1 April 2003.
  • RFC 3751 — Omniscience Protocol Requirements. S. Bradner 1 April 2004.
  • RFC 4041 — Requirements for Morality Sections in Routing Area Drafts. A. Farrel. 1 April 2005.
  • RFC 4042 — UTF-9 and UTF-18 Efficient Transformation Formats of Unicode. M. Crispin. 1 April 2005.

Source

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External links

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